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A NOTE FROM THE CURATORS

When we started work on the Museum of Memories, we had several conversations about our interpretations of “heritage” and how it informs our gender identities. As individuals in the 18-25 age group, understanding what forms our personal and collective identities has taken on importance - especially in the midst of a global pandemic when it became crucial for us to look back and find grounding in our roots, which might remain unchanged. Still, we found that we could not look to the past for stability, because despite being on the other side of this project, the blanks in our histories continue to be filled every day. 

 

We as curators recognised that although there might be similar threads in our explorations beyond the masc-dominant, patriarchal narratives that the historical canon has followed, there was no one experience (or twelve experiences) that could speak for the collective. So we set out primarily to seek perspectives, of minoritised genders and sexual identities. This project is not a history lesson on heritage, but a repository of stories that look forwards and backwards at once, trying to place themselves in larger narratives to make sense of themselves. Can the same lens of a modern-day angry feminist be applied to her grandmother’s experience of an early marriage? Can the rigid gender norms of religion and religious spaces be chipped away at to pave way for more inclusive systems? And how does one gather the courage to bring up mental health in a project about a past that completely ignored its existenceuntil now.

 

You are invited to take time to engage with each contribution. To contemplate the stories and memory carried within ourselves; all the intergenerational forces, the nostalgia, and the tangible and intangible oddities that have been passed down over time. And maybe to open doors and dialogues to a deeper understanding of the things that form our worldviews, and our ideas of “self”. 

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Blue and Grey

Apurva Korde
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To Insanity

Dhruvi Modi
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A Gender Investment

Neer Sihag 
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A Queer Inheritance: Borrowed and Stolen

 

Aditya Vikram
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The Grandmother Theory

Geethika Nair 
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The Curious Curio

 

Charvi Venkat 
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My Anxiety has

its Ancestors

Gargi Upadhyay
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Fragments of Memories

Surabhi

In the lifetime of a hibiscus

Bidisha Mahapatra
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A Midsummer Night’s Communion

Jose
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The Earth and

Her Daughters

Maitreyee Mhatre 

Amma, and my Tambura

Lakshmi Ramesh 
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C O N T R I B U T O R S

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CHARVI VENKAT

THE CURIOUS CURIO

GARGI UPADHYAY

 MY ANXIETY HAS 

ITS ANCESTORS

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BIDISHA MAHAPATRA

IN THE LIFETIME OF A HIBISCUS

NEER SIHAG

A GENDER INVESTMENT

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APURVA KORDE

BLUE AND GREY

ADITYA VIKRAM

A QUEER INHERITANCE:

BORROWED & STOLEN

DHRUVI MODI

TO INSANITY

SURABHI

FRAGMENTS OF MEMORIES

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MAITREYEE MHATRE

THE EARTH AND

HER DAUGHTERS

GEETHIKA NAIR

THE GRANDMOTHER THEORY

JOSE

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S

COMMUNION

LAKSHMI RAMESH

AMMA, AND

MY TAMURA

C U R A T O R S

Aakriti Chandervanshi, 25

Most of Aakritis days are spent in travelling places and documenting spaces, exploring the themes of physical and emotional connection embedded in the landscapes of South Asia. As an architect and visual artist, the roots of her practice emerge from the keen interest in the historicities of the built environment and relevant debates around the discourse on their conservation. Aakriti hopes to bring conversations around mental wellness and queer rights forward, through Museum of Memories. She is  devoted to her work and pets, perhaps not as equally as she would like.

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Charulatha Dasappa, 25

Charulatha’s explorations are (currently) a way for her to navigate questions of temporality, survival, and finding hope. Primarily an editor, she also writes and immerses herself in art and its call. 

For her, the Museum of Memories has been a wonderful place to engage with the ideas of tactile memory and memory carried within the bodies of women and other gender minorities, which she is particularly interested in.

Mallika Dabke, 24

Mallikas day job is in media, but she thrives on her multiple side hustles that are usually writing or curatorial projects. In her work shes always looking for the very specific intersection of art, culture, food, feminism, environment, politics and all things queer. For some time now she’s been interested in the themes of nostalgia, identity, home and belonging which are so crucial to Museum of Memories.

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